The Sherman Centre for Culture and Ideas

There have always been profound conversations between different forms of visual expression. Although fields such as contemporary art, fashion and architecture sometimes seem to operate in their own hermetically sealed bubbles – complete with private codes and insider references – seeking out the common ground between them is essential when it comes to driving the culture forward.

The Sherman Centre for Culture and Ideas (SCCI) is on a mission to provide a platform for deep engagement in the fields of fashion and architecture, within the broader context of contemporary art and culture. Conceived by Dr Gene Sherman, the Sydney philanthropist whose previous endeavours included Sherman Galleries and the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, SCCI takes an approach to cultural programming that is as rigorous as it is inclusive. It launched with Fashion Hub, an April fashion festival that featured Women in Shadow, a runway show that saw artists Nasim Nasr explore the notion of the veil
as cultural signifier, a fashion book club and panels featuring the likes of award-winning author Helen Garner, Japanese fashion designer Akira Minagawa and Bandana Tewari, the editor-at-large of Vogue India. And over a 10-day period in October, SCCI will turn its focus to architecture, as well as its intersections with new technologies, community, wellbeing and social justice. Highlights include an architecture film festival curated by architect Brian Zulaikha of Sydney firm Tonkin Zulaikha Greer, Architecture Words, a program that mines the relationship between architecture, place and fiction and the Australian Institution of Art History Pavilions Seminar at the Art Gallery of New South Wales on October 15. The SCCI Fashion and Architecture Hubs will be programmed over five years from 2018 to 2022. The 2018 Architecture Hub opens October 12 and runs until October 21, 2018. 

 

 

scci.org.au

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